Virginia Intermont College

Virginia Intermont College

Motto
Nil sine numine

Motto in English

Nothing without Guidance

Type
Private school

Established
1884

Endowment
$4 million (as of 2011)[1]

Chairman
Kathleen O’Brien

President
Art Rebrovick

Provost
Dr. Cynthia Ward

Academic staff

45 (as of 2011)[1]

Students
591 (as of 2011)[2]

Location
Bristol, Virginia, United States
36°36′18″N 82°10′35″W / 36.6050°N 82.1764°W / 36.6050; -82.1764Coordinates: 36°36′18″N 82°10′35″W / 36.6050°N 82.1764°W / 36.6050; -82.1764

Campus
Suburban, 147 acres

Colors
Black and Vegas Gold    

Athletics
NAIA Division II

Nickname
Cobras

Affiliations
Appalachian Athletic Conference

Website

www.vic.edu/

Virginia Intermont College

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Location
Moore and Harmeling Sts., Bristol, Virginia

Coordinates
36°36′18″N 82°10′35″W / 36.60500°N 82.17639°W / 36.60500; -82.17639

Area
5 acres (2.0 ha)

Built
1891

Architect
Tinsley,Walter P.

Architectural style
Late Victorian

NRHP Reference #
84000032[3]

Added to NRHP
October 4, 1984

Virginia Intermont College (VI) was a private, four-year liberal arts college in Bristol, Virginia. Founded in 1884 to create additional education opportunities for women, the College had been coeducational since 1972. It experienced significant financial difficulties during the last years of its existence, was denied accreditation in 2013, and announced its closure on May 20, 2014.[4]
The name “Intermont” was a reference to the College’s mountain setting. The Holston Range, which merges into the Blue Ridge Mountains, can be seen from the campus in Bristol, Virginia, part of the Tri-Cities region, which also includes Johnson City and Kingsport, Tennessee.

Contents

1 History
2 Accreditation
3 Campus
4 Buildings
5 Organization
6 Honors program
7 Athletics
8 Student clubs
9 School traditions
10 Noted alumni
11 References
12 External links

History[edit]
The College was founded as Southwest Virginia Institute in Glade Spring, Virginia on September 17, 1884 by Reverend J.R. Harrison, a Baptist minister, as a means to bring higher education opportunities to women in southwest Virginia. Instructing both boarding and day students, the school steadily grew until it outgrew its facilities in less than ten years.
The College began moving to a new site in Bristol, Virginia in 1891, completing it
네임드